“Return” is the name given to tiles which break during the manufacturing process. This breakage material can be material generated from tiles breaking during both wet and dry production procedures.


Eliane Ceramic Tiles says it didn’t become the “largest producer of tile material in Brazil” by overlooking current world trends, both from a style standpoint or an ecological one.

The monoporosa (single fired) manufacturing process at Eliane reuses 20% of the raw materials incorporated in the ceramic paste production process. These reused materials include E.T.E. Compound, a substance derived from the liquid effluent treatment process which takes place in three Eliane factories located in Cocal do Sul, state of Catarina. This effluent is made up of residues from the paste and glaze preparation sectors (residues from the glazing lines), and water from the dye preparation of tile material that calls for water for washing.

Solids and liquids are separated; the resulting solids are called “E.T.E Mud.” This mud material is subsequently channeled to the blending operation area, where it is combined with raw tile breakage material (before firing) and chamotte (from fired pieces) into a blend which then forms the monoporossa/single firing compounds.

“Return” is the name given to tiles which break during the manufacturing process. This breakage material can be material generated from tiles breaking during both wet and dry production procedures.

After the composition qualifies to meet technical characteristics for reuse in manufacturing, the residues are blended (return, chamotte and E.T.E mud), homogenized and then closely analyzed for verification of established patterns. Once OK’d, the compound may then be reused in the ceramic paste.

Further, Eliane says it also reuses water in the ceramic paste preparation process. Most of the water used in all production processes is recycled. After it is separated from liquid effluents, the water is treated and almost 100% reused.

“Eliane has been a leader in energy conservation and in the recycling of waste material for many years,” stated Edson Gaidzinski, Jr., Eliane’s ceo. “We actually were an “eco-friendly” manufacturer even before the term was globally recognized as being synonymous with ‘green.’”